Shopsmith Forums

Go Back   Shopsmith Forums > Main Woodworking Forum > Beginning Woodworking
Register FAQ Members List Calendar Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read

Reply
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread Display Modes
  #1  
Old 02-11-2012, 03:36 PM
saltysteele saltysteele is offline
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2
Default Lathe accuracy

I've my Shopsmith for over 7 years now, and have yet to use it. It's a green model.

I recently found a fella who has started to show me how to turn wood (the reason I bought it).

I just have the spur drive and dead center that came with it. I've been looking for a good deal on a nova G3, and have found a pretty good one. However, what is really Pi@@@ng me off about SS, is the fact that you pay through the behind for these things (unless you buy a used one - which I did), and then they charge you 30 bucks for a manual. 10 more bucks for a supplement to the manual. there are NO perks to being a shopsmith owner. a lot of the products SS sells that are made by other manufacturers (the nova G3, for instance) are more expensive from SS, than other places (even with having to buying the adapter at other places).

anyway, i've been doing a lot of research, and I keep hearing about the wobble, because of the single-bearing quill. well, according to SS, the 2-bearing quill upgrade does not work with the gilmer drive systems (what I have). SS even says the single-bearing quill is less accurate and has problems with wobble and runout. they, themselves, are admitting this machine is not accurate. Do I want to be turning a pen that has less than 1/8" of wood on top of the inner barrel, with a machine that doesn't turn true?

i bought this thing, mostly because of the lathe functionality. what is everyone's honest opinion on the accuracy (ie, wobble and runout) of the lathe function? it would seem to me, that by extending the quill, you are making it less stable.

it may be good for pens and candlesticks, but that is not what i'm interested in doing. i'm also not interested in chasing this thing all over the shop (doesn't sound real safe).

if you couldn't tell, i'm kind of irked with my purchase 7 years ago, and am trying to think of a reason to keep it.

is every other forum on the internet that is not a Shopsmith forum wrong?

normally, i would say, yes, a tool snob is going to say everything else is poor quality. but when every other owner of a different tool brand agrees with each other than one brand is a "alright" jack of all trades, but a poor specialist, i wonder. when other brands of this type of device are referred to as "a more heavy duty shopsmith," it doesn't inspire confidence.

i would like honest opinions on the lathes functionality.

Last edited by saltysteele : 02-11-2012 at 03:44 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #2  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:17 PM
fjimp's Avatar
fjimp fjimp is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Lakewood, Colorado
Posts: 2,328
Default

So let me get this straight. You bought a used tool because you weren't willing to invest the dollars in a new one. Then you let it sit for seven years. On top of that you feel your having been cheap entitles you to free manuals and repairs? Do you also feel that some kind tool fairy should stop by periodically and clean the tool for you at no charge? I took a different route I bought new and received all manuals and even books to teach me how it works. Because my tool was new it had a warranty, which incidentally I never needed to use. You see mine is trouble free, it works like a champ and clearly is built by a top notch company who still makes parts. I wish you all the luck in the world but feel compelled to point out there is no free lunch. We all seem to get what we pay for.
__________________
F. Jim Parks
Lakewood, Colorado

When the love of power is replaced by the power of love the world will have a chance for survival.
Reply With Quote
  #3  
Old 02-11-2012, 04:26 PM
fiatben's Avatar
fiatben fiatben is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: northwest Arkansas
Posts: 735
Default heard it all before

To me the only opinion that counts is one that comes from someone with actual experience, either good or bad. Most people are simply repeating what they heard/read somewhere else.
That being said, and I'm sure people with much more experience and knowledge will soon weigh in on this, I've seen turnings done by Shopsmith owners that compete with anything out there.
As for the single bearing/double bearing debate, you will find information that says the double bearing was done as a major improvement and you also find information that says it was done as a response to competition (keeping up with the Jones as it where).
If the bearing in your Gilmer drive, single bearing SS is in good shape, it shouldn't be much of an issue. As I understand it, the issue of runout only truly comes into play more when drilling than turning. How accurate is accurate? Some guys here want to dial their machines into the .001 range for runout/parallel/square. Many of us are happy with anything under 1/64th of an inch (since our eyes aren't that good anymore).
In my opinion, based on my own experience and what I've read from others here, the most serious drawback to an SS as a lathe is in low-end speed. This is doubly true if you intend to turn big stuff that is rough (out of balance). The second problem would be keeping the darn toolrest locked down tight.
From what little you've shared, I'd say jump in there with a piece of wood and start turning on your SS. You'll quickly want to add a better tailstock center, as in a live one with a bearing, and at least one faceplate and a chuck (although I'm still waiting to buy a chuck). I'm assuming that since you've been waiting seven years, you don't have an alternative lathe. You also did not indicate your experience level, which would be really helpful in trying to give good advice.
I've used both my 1955 500 (gilmer, single) and my 1989 510 with the "larger" motor (see other threads) and double bearing quill. I am not sure I can tell any major difference, but I do not consider myself an experienced turner.
Here's a couple of things I've turned lately:

Name:  TireThumper on 510 (6).JPG
Views: 420
Size:  122.0 KB

Name:  Rattles.JPG
Views: 420
Size:  145.7 KB
Attached Images
File Type: jpg Occarina.JPG (472.1 KB, 77 views)
__________________
'55 Greenie #292284 (Mar-55), '89 SS 510 #020989, Mark VII #408551 (sold 10/14/12), SS Band Saw, (SS 500 #36063 (May-79) now gone to son-in-law as of 11-11), Magna bandsaw, Magna jointer 16185 (May-54), Magna belt sander SS28712 (Dec-82), Magna jigsaw SS4397 (Dec-78), SS biscuit joiner, Zyliss (knockoff) vise, 20+ hand planes, 60s Craftsman tablesaw, CarbaTec mini-lathe, and the usual pile of tools. Hermit of the Hills Woodworks, a hillbilly in the foothills of the Ozarks, scraping by.
Reply With Quote
  #4  
Old 02-11-2012, 05:05 PM
algale algale is online now
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Nov 2010
Location: Maryland
Posts: 1,527
Default

Your post is likely to rub some people around here the wrong way.

To answer your question, it sounds to me like you've got everything you need (spur, dead center, standard tool rest and chisels) to start turning away so why don't you try the machine out for yourself? Determine for yourself if it is adequate for what you want to do with a lathe.

I suspect that you will find the Shopsmith more than adequate and that if you initially get less than perfect results it will be more an indication of your own inexperience rather than any limitation inherent in the Shopsmith. As you get better you can invest in upgrades, such as the G3 or the Universal Tool Rest, which is expensive but probably the best banjo on any lathe anywhere at any price. The Speed Reducer will be necessary if you want to turn large out of balance burl or blanks.

If you decide to keep the Shopsmith get used to idea that you are going to read a lot of posts on the woodworking forums telling you that the Shopsmith isn't good enough for whatever it is you want to do with it and who are going to suggest you buy all stand alone tools. If you are the kind of person who is bothered by that kind of talk, put the Shopsmith on Craigslist now and go buy yourself a top of the line lathe.
Reply With Quote
  #5  
Old 02-11-2012, 05:29 PM
fiatben's Avatar
fiatben fiatben is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Mar 2010
Location: northwest Arkansas
Posts: 735
Default I'll take it

Post your location in your profile and if you find it just isn't your cup of tea, there is probably a forum member nearby who'd be happy to unload it for you.

I have two. I had a third one but gave it to my son-in-law after rehabbing it back into working condition. I kinda wish I'd kept it and let him buy a drill press (which is what he was looking for). I wouldn't mind having a third one at all.

It you want an idea of what can be done with the machines (beyond turning), look for the thread about elves back in December in the community forum. And someone has a website dedicated to things made on Shopsmiths.

Personally, I've done everything from turning some really nice pen/pencil sets to completely remodeling a kitchen.

Yeah, factory parts (including manuals) are a bit pricey, but almost anything you need can be found thru ebay or craigslist if you're patient. For that matter, many forum members are some of the most helpful woodworkers I know and have helped me more than once to round out something I was missing. Thanks to these guys I was able to afford a manual and several SPTs, and I've been able to rebuild machines and make improvements I would never have thought of on my own.

So, like Algale said grab a stick of firewood and start turning.... and then post pics so we can all see what you've done. And ask ANY questions that come up. I guarantee someone on here will have an answer (or several).
__________________
'55 Greenie #292284 (Mar-55), '89 SS 510 #020989, Mark VII #408551 (sold 10/14/12), SS Band Saw, (SS 500 #36063 (May-79) now gone to son-in-law as of 11-11), Magna bandsaw, Magna jointer 16185 (May-54), Magna belt sander SS28712 (Dec-82), Magna jigsaw SS4397 (Dec-78), SS biscuit joiner, Zyliss (knockoff) vise, 20+ hand planes, 60s Craftsman tablesaw, CarbaTec mini-lathe, and the usual pile of tools. Hermit of the Hills Woodworks, a hillbilly in the foothills of the Ozarks, scraping by.
Reply With Quote
  #6  
Old 02-11-2012, 05:36 PM
JPG40504's Avatar
JPG40504 JPG40504 is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Dec 2008
Location: Lexington, Ky (WILDCAT territory)
Posts: 19,092
Default

I think that one who appears to be a fledgling 'turner' should learn the basics of turning before getting wrapped up in finer details of any equipment he currently has.

Now as far as no 'perks' re SS, do consider that you own a half century old piece of equipment that is the produce of a company that has been under control of 4 (four) different corporate entities and the current corporation still makes replacement parts for it even though those parts have not been used on any 'current' products for almost a half century. You are bent out of shape because an upgrade that has only been in production for less that 20 yrs will not fit your 50+ year old headstock in spite of the fact that you can upgrade the headstock so that that recent upgrade will be possible.

Add to that the fact that the latest upgrade is possible to all but the 2 models that preceded yours.

Yes as a lathe the low speed range is too fast. A recently(compared to the age of your equipment) designed speed reducer will fit it.

Apparently you think that those folks who occupy those other forums are more knowledgeable regarding SS capabilities in spite of little or no actual first hand experience than those who have actually used it for a very long time. If all those negative things were true we would have abandoned it decades ago! That is not saying that some accommodation need not be exercised due to it's uniqueness, but they are less of a 'problem' than the alternatives.

I bought a used compound miter saw that has a bad drive gear. That model is less that 10 years old. Part is 'obsolete' and unavailable.

Trade ya!

Manuals: So you bought a used item from an unknown that did not include a manual. The item was not produced by the current corporation that originally merely sold it as a convenience to its customers but was created by a corporation that currently is still in business. Why are you barking up SS's tree? They did not make it in the first place. Why are you not bugging Nova for a manual? Someone here might be willing to share a copy of theirs to someone who would appreciate it!

As for your possibly wobbly quill. A new bearing(yes the bearings are stock items, not exotic no source available tomorrow) will eliminate it and return it to as good as new(a half century ago) capability. Question I have is have you encountered the dire wobbliness yourself, or are you reacting to external influences?

I will leave it to others to answer your lathe capability question, but if bowl making(involving unbalanced workpieces) is in your future, a speed reducer or a slower running lathe is needed. A bandsaw may also be a handy addition!

FWIW the 'solution' to all your quill/speed/accuracy 'issues' is available as an upgrade that will include that 2 bearing quill, and a slower speed range(as well as almost doubling the high end).

All this 'research'. Perhaps it comes 7 years late!




Methinks thee protesteths too much!
__________________
JPG

Goldie(Bought New SN 377425)/4"jointer/6"beltsander/1"stripsander/bandsaw/ /powerstation/Craftsman10"ras/Craftsman6"thicknessplaner/ /Dayton10"tablesaw(restoredfromneighborstrashpile)/ /10[COLOR=Red]E[/COLOR](SN E3779) restoration in progress, a 510 on the back burner and a growing pile of items to be eventually returned to useful life. - aka Red Grange
Reply With Quote
  #7  
Old 02-11-2012, 05:42 PM
kd6vpe's Avatar
kd6vpe kd6vpe is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jun 2007
Location: Owasso, Oklahoma
Posts: 525
Default

Turn things with my old shopsmith. It works fine for me. I have made goblets, trains, a 14" segmented bowl, segmented plates, pepper grinders, candlestick holders. All have turned out nice. The only thing I can tell you is make sure use use bees wax on the dead center as a lubricant when you start turning or you will build up enough heat on the end of you stock and burn the work. You will need to keep adding lubricant as you go. Once you notice heat build up stop and add more wax. I learned using the spur and dead center. Once I knew how much I like turning on my SS I bought a talon chuck from woodcraft and a live center also from woodcraft and use them all the time now. I also still use my spur drive when turning spindle instead of the chuck but the more you try and learn then you will understand why this decision needs to be made. Have fun with what you own, try it and you may find you like it. Oh yes of course sharp tools no matter what brand lathe you have or use will make a world of difference. Please just try it before agreeing with others that have not use it or owned one. I have other equipment that I use besides my shopsmith that I like but my go to is my shopsmith. I bought it used from CL and had no manual with it. I found this forum, tried the equipment found it work great and to help support my future parts inventory I bought a manual from SS. Geez it cost money but it taught me what I needed to know about my equipment that I already own.
__________________
SS 500 upgraded to 510; SS bandsaw; SS jointer
SS Oscillating Drum Sander; Universal Lathe Rest;
lathe duplicatior, shaper fence and shapers; SS Belt
Sander
Jim
[URL="www.youtube.com/kd6vpe"]www.youtube.com/kd6vpe[/URL]

Last edited by kd6vpe : 02-11-2012 at 05:57 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #8  
Old 02-11-2012, 07:04 PM
saltysteele saltysteele is offline
Bronze Member
 
Join Date: Jan 2012
Posts: 2
Default

as stated, i am new to turning. the fella I bought it from was supposed to get back to me with the chuck that he had for it. He did not live at the location where I picked it up. He never got back to me, nor would he return my calls. I have no one that I know that does wood working or turning, so I didn't have the resources to figure out how to use the thing.

As far as perks, I don't expect a yearly calendar, coffee cup or 25% discount (you wouldn't be buying stuff for it, if you didn't own one, so everyone buying would qualify for a discount). What I would expect, is that I could buy an owners manual for less than what it costs to buy 10-15 reams of paper.

I appreciate your input. I realize there is tool snobbery, but at the same time, I didn't want a thread of "hey, i love my SS, don't you?" I want a legitimate defense.

Anyway, after 7 years, I have found an older gentleman who just got back into turning, and has been kind enough to show me. In digging through the box of papers, saw blades and the tool rest, I found the spur drive. I had no clue on how to use a lathe, the drives, chucks, tools, anything. Never had a wood shop class, never knew anyone that did wood work. However, it's always fascinated me (turning wood).

My SS appears to be have kept in good condition, the ways look great, the machine is clean and it runs smooth and quiet.

My dilemma now is do I want to spend the 125 bucks on a G3? Yes, I am interested in turning pens, but bowls/platters are what I am mainly interested in. Do I want to spend money on the G3, pen mandrel and accessories, and tools. I do need to buy tools of my own; my friend has offered to borrow me some, but I don't like to borrow tools from people. Guys have a tendency to be pretty protective, and you never know when something has sentimental value you were not aware of.

It's not just a matter of being cheap, it's a matter of I don't want to purchase $2-300 worth of accessories and materials to do this stuff, on top of the money I spent for my SS, only to have shoddy results. Are these single-bearing quills capable of turning wood bigger than a cereal bowl? My wife is going to kill me if I purchase all the needed supplies, only to then immediately have to turn around and buy a new quill.

Everything is vague, in my research, as to how heavy duty these things are. People either love them or hate them. I know not to listen to the haters, but I would appreciate if the lovers could let me know the machine's limitations and weaknesses. I understand the defensiveness, I am not asking anyone to run the machine down, just it's limitations.

I'm not a hater, I just want to be convinced. I don't want to damage the machine, only to have to fix it, to sell it; or be one of those guys that gives their friend their old SS.

Some of my questions have already been answered, but I just wanted to explain my first post. I have been looking and looking for info, that I cannot find. I only find hate fests or love fests.

I hope this thing can do what I want it to do, because my wife isn't going to let me spend $500+ on something else (well, she would, but not without her then going on a spending spree, too).

Don't mean to sound like a jerk, just would rather be direct, than sprinkle sugar on every question.

Nothing here is meant to offend or say "SS's are stupid, and so are the people who own them!"
Reply With Quote
  #9  
Old 02-11-2012, 07:45 PM
reible's Avatar
reible reible is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Aurora, IL
Posts: 5,001
Default

Hi and WELCOME to the forums!

I'd like to think we might have some information here that will help you out so please stay a while and do some reading, post questions and with any luck at all perhaps things will fall in to place for you and your shopsmith. I will comment within your post to fill you in on a few things, look for the blue.

[quote=saltysteele]I've my Shopsmith for over 7 years now, and have yet to use it. It's a green model.

Yes you have a machine that was made between 52 and 59 years ago. It has a single bearing quill and a 3/4HP motor. Being that old it might need a few new parts like a new quill bearing, new Gilmer belt and who knows what else. It might need some TLC by way of clean up and rust removal and lubrication. A lot depends on how well previous owner(s) took care of it and what you have done with it the past 7 years.

Not sure how much you invested in the purchase and what you got with it but depending on location you still might be able to sell it for a few hundred dollars if that is what you want to do, this I guess is about what you paid for it too?

If you were to chose to use it as is well that might work but it is likely after all these years you will incur some costs.


I recently found a fella who has started to show me how to turn wood (the reason I bought it).

Is this same "fella" the one who doesn't like shopsmiths? If you want to learn how to use a shopsmith this is likely not the person to learn from. Since we have a lot of members here you might want to add your location to your profile and you might get lucky and have some one who could help get you started that knows how a shopsmith works.

I just have the spur drive and dead center that came with it. I've been looking for a good deal on a nova G3, and have found a pretty good one. However, what is really Pi@@@ng me off about SS, is the fact that you pay through the behind for these things (unless you buy a used one - which I did), and then they charge you 30 bucks for a manual. 10 more bucks for a supplement to the manual. there are NO perks to being a shopsmith owner.

There is no doubt that a shopsmith is an investment. I would hate to guess how much money I have spent over the years of new goodies, and upgrades. Most of us just see that as the cost of doing business, as in hobby business.

The money you save by getting things used is what is left over for buying things like manuals and repairs.

One of the "perks" is have a forum to come to with questions and even gripes. You get to mingle with people who have owned a shopsmith for 36 years and presently own 5 of them. And, there are quite a few with even more experience.

Other perks are in the form of being able to upgrade. You have a tool that was made at least 52 years ago but you can still get to the current version by way of upgrades, not many tools can do that. Say you want to make this more of lathe, purchase a few upgrades like the speed reducer, now you are in the ball park of a pretty expensive lathe with rpm's down to 100. Add the 35 pound universal lathe tool rest, and a live center or two. Not cheap but still something you can do.


Tried to post and I'm getting an error I've never seen before
"
  1. The text that you have entered is too long (10208 characters). Please shorten it to 10000 characters long."
I've spit it here and will post part two soon.


I want to let you all know it has been a while since I started my reply so sorry for duplication or other problems this delay may cause.


Ed

Last edited by reible : 02-11-2012 at 09:12 PM.
Reply With Quote
  #10  
Old 02-11-2012, 07:46 PM
reible's Avatar
reible reible is offline
Gold Member
 
Join Date: Jul 2006
Location: Aurora, IL
Posts: 5,001
Default

continuance of my other post


a lot of the products SS sells that are made by other manufacturers (the nova G3, for instance) are more expensive from SS, than other places (even with having to buying the adapter at other places).

This is a free market so if you feel you can get a better deal on a chuck or what ever feel free to do so. I know that shopsmith would like your business but then they have set the price point and you have the ability to shop were ever you chose. Any reason you feel compelled to shop at shopsmith? If not then what's the point? Yes some here feel that purchasing from shopsmith keeps them in business and in the long run helps to insure we can still get parts and upgrades in the forth coming years, also a valid point especially for those that see my kids and their kids still having running shopsmith to use long after we are gone.


anyway, i've been doing a lot of research, and I keep hearing about the wobble, because of the single-bearing quill. well, according to SS, the 2-bearing quill upgrade does not work with the gilmer drive systems (what I have). SS even says the single-bearing quill is less accurate and has problems with wobble and runout. they, themselves, are admitting this machine is not accurate. Do I want to be turning a pen that has less than 1/8" of wood on top of the inner barrel, with a machine that doesn't turn true?

I can not speak towards what sate your machine is in but it would likely be in need of a new bearing by this age. This is something you can do yourself for the cost of a bearing, most likely less then $10. When you do that you will well within the capacity of most other tools. If you want you can even update your drive system and get the new 2 bearing quill.

Or you might find that some members here might have an update quill that has been developed. I don't keep up on that as I don't have any machines that would benefit. But you can ask around here for updated details.

i bought this thing, mostly because of the lathe functionality. what is everyone's honest opinion on the accuracy (ie, wobble and runout) of the lathe function? it would seem to me, that by extending the quill, you are making it less stable.

Are you looking for numbers? All I can say is that I have never had any issues with wobble and or runout. I can say that the new quill I have had for say the last 10 or so years has less then .0025" TIR run out and the G3 adds a small amount and even extended it is less the .0035". That is way more then you need for most lathe work.

The quill upgrade was just an upgrade, some people have done it others have not. Some have questioned the need as they are happy with what they have. I personally was due for a new bearing in my machine but decided on the upgrade instead. I keep my old one around in case I need it someday as it still is in working conditions.


it may be good for pens and candlesticks, but that is not what i'm interested in doing. i'm also not interested in chasing this thing all over the shop (doesn't sound real safe).

If you have to chase the shopsmith around the shop you are being unsafe! If you chase any lathe around the shop you being unsafe. If the lathe is that unbalanced a heavy lathe might not move around but it sure could throw the hunk of wood at you. Unsafe is unsafe. A shopsmith is not going to preform like a giant lathe you pay $12K for but for most turning in the the capacity of the lathe, say with a G3 chuck is about 14" in diameter and you balance the stock and you have the rpm low enough it will work fine.

BTW you never did mention what type lathe work you intended to do.

if you couldn't tell, i'm kind of irked with my purchase 7 years ago, and am trying to think of a reason to keep it.

is every other forum on the internet that is not a Shopsmith forum wrong?

Not every person is meant to be a shopsmith owner. The jury is out on you. From what it sounds like you are having buy's remorse 7 years later. From that I'm gathering you have recently found out that there are people who for what other distorted reason hate shopsmiths. This is not new.

Now most of those people have little to no knowledge of the shopsmith and very likely have never seen one up close and personal much less ever took the time to learn how they work. It could be someone who has owned one for seven years but never used it. Then on some other forum we see this post saying "I owned a shopsmith for 7 years and it was a big waste of time and never did what I wanted it to." How this translates to most of us is there is one of those people who never used his machine and is bad mouthing the tool rather then admit there total lack of knowledge on the subject.


normally, i would say, yes, a tool snob is going to say everything else is poor quality. but when every other owner of a different tool brand agrees with each other than one brand is a "alright" jack of all trades, but a poor specialist, i wonder. when other brands of this type of device are referred to as "a more heavy duty shopsmith," it doesn't inspire confidence.

Or you could look at this forum for a week or two and see what others are doing on their shopsmiths, see how we are keeping machines from 1947 working and the special attachments we make, the custom work some have done. Now find some other group who has an "xyz" brand that is still going with their tools for this long.

Or maybe you can find a tool that has just introduced a new state of the art headstock like shopsmith has done, and one that can be slid on your old shopsmith tubes and still work with other parts of the system (new PowerPro headstock). Or hey how about a place you can even find many parts for after 30 years. Maybe that should get a place on the confidence line?

Of course you can choice to listen to non owners, non shopsmith educated people because they are so wise about all things shopsmith or maybe not?

The ultimate choice is yours. If you have the money and want a nice lathe and you don't have need for other shopsmith functions sell the shopsmith and put your money towards say a nice

Nova DVR XP Lathe $2249.99
Add a cast iron stand $399.99
Onway Stronghold chuck $299.99 (adapter $32.99)
I'd have to let you pick the rest of the things you need but I would allow for say another $1000.

Hey now you have a pretty good lathe system and I think you will enjoy it. Lets see now, that is about $3982.96 plus S&H and taxes minus $200 for the shopsmith. Anyway you would have to do the math for the exact amounts.

i would like honest opinions on the lathes functionality.[/quote]

It has been a couple of hours since I started this so please forgive and duplication with others who many have posted.

Ed

Last edited by reible : 02-11-2012 at 09:10 PM.
Reply With Quote
Reply


Currently Active Users Viewing This Thread: 1 (0 members and 1 guests)
 
Thread Tools Search this Thread
Search this Thread:

Advanced Search
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
First Time Shopsmith and Lathe User Culprit Beginning Woodworking 15 12-26-2011 02:21 PM
Quick help with lathe set up edward Beginning Woodworking 3 12-04-2011 03:19 PM
SS Lathe and the 1963 Yuba Court Case ddvann79 Woodworking Tool Review 36 03-10-2011 10:44 AM
Gunhead CnC 7x lathe. cornelius Woodworking Tool Review 1 05-05-2010 08:37 PM
Fred Williamson's lathe iclark Community 11 09-09-2009 10:16 AM




Powered by vBulletin Version 3.5.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.